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 Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*

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MiNd
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Join date : 2012-12-07
Age : 27

PostSubject: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:17 pm

This guide will be for tuning touge cars in the standard way, I know there are some people who tune their cars in unorthodox ways, but this will just be the normal way.

Complete Tuning Guide!


-------------Upgrades-------------


Performance - For Touge, not the most important, when you need to fill up the rest of your PI (Getting it to the top of the class such as B500, A600 etc

Handling - You pretty much want all race parts in this category. You want this because the most critical thing for touge is the cornering.

Drivetrain - Again, you want pretty much all of this. Most of these parts affect the acceleration (clutch & transmission) which is also very important for touge.

Tire and Wheels - Since race tires are the standard (and can't restrict them in public lobbies) you will want race tires and full width. The more tire on the road, the more grip you will have. Also you want to pick some aftermarket rims, most rims are lighter so it will make your car just a bit lighter.

-------------Tuning-------------


Tire Pressure---------------------------------------------------------------------

You can't transmit your car's power and handling potential to the road without the right tire setup, because tire pressure affects a tire's peak grip, responsiveness and wear. Adjust the front tire pressure when the tires are cold so they reach peak grip after they heat up to race temperatures.

Peak Grip Temperature is between 180 and 210 degrees, and as long as you're running a race psi of 30-34 degrees, you're still in good grip range.

To adjust. Start by doing some test laps, bring up the heat and tires misc. telemetry and observe the temperature & pressure. You could also run a lap in Hot Lap or a Public lobby, save the replay, and go to the telemetry that way. Either way, but the replay method helps for those who can't drive with the tire telemetry up since it is kinda distracting.

What you want in tuning your tires is to have all four tires AND the inner, middle, and outer parts of your tire relatively close to each other.

Now here are some scenarios you will run into-

Scenario - Cause - Recommended Adjustment

Center hotter than edges - Tire pressure too high - Reduce 1 psi for each 5 deg F difference

Edges hotter than center - Tire pressure too low - Add 1 psi for each 5 deg F difference

Inner edge hotter than outer edge - Too much negative camber - Decrease negative camber

Outer edge hotter than inner edge - Not enough negative camber or too much toe-in - Increase negative camber or decrease toe-in

Tire below peak temperature range - Tire pressure too high, tire too wide or springs/sway bars too soft at that axle - Decrease tire pressure. reduce tire width or stiffen up springs and sway bars on that axle

Tires above peak temperature range - Tire pressure too low, tire too narrow, or springs/sway bars too stiff at that axle - Increase tire pressure, increase tire width or soften up springs and sway bars on that axle

Front tires hotter than rear - Car is under steering. Too much front spring/sway bar, not enough rear spring/sway bar, front pressure too high, front tires too narrow, rear tires too wide - Soften up front spring and sway bar, stiffen up rear spring and sway bar, decrease front pressure or increase rear pressure

Rear tires hotter than front - Car is over steering. Too much rear spring/sway bar, not enough front spring/sway bar, front pressure too high, rear pressure too low, rear tires too narrow, front tires too wide - Soften up rear spring and sway bar, stiffen up front spring and sway bar, decrease rear pressure or increase front pressure

Alignment---------------------------------------------------------------------

When describing a cars handling, you will need to know these two terms, Oversteer and Understeer.

Oversteer - When the back end of your cars starts sliding, if your a drifter, then you know what this is Very Happy

Understeer - When you are trying to turn but the car just won't.

Camber -

Camber is the inward or outward tilt of the wheel when viewing from the front or rear of the car. Camber is probably the most useful and popular alignment adjustment that can be made to a streetcar.

Maximum cornering force is achieved when the camber of the outside wheels relative to the ground is about -0.5 degrees. A slight negative camber in a turn maximizes the tire contact patch due to the way the tire deforms under lateral load. Hence, it is good to have some negative camber to increase cornering force.

View from the front of a car

Camber - Straight (0 degrees)

          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****

Camber - (Negative Degrees)

          / ****    ****
         / ****       ****
        / ****          ****
       / ****             ****
      / ****                ****

Camber - Out (Positive Degrees]

      \ ****                 ****
       \ ****              ****
        \ ****           ****
         \ ****       ****
          \ ****    ****

For Touge, you are going to want Negative camber for both front and rear, the key is to how much. Your going to want between -2.0 to -.5 in the front and about -1.7 to -0.3 in the rear. As you can see from the numbers, you will want more negative camber in the front than the rear.

Toe -

Toe is how close or far apart the fronts of the tires are from each other. It is a bit easier to show then to explain so more diagrams!

Top down view of a tire in pairs

Toe - Straight (0 degrees)

  / \   ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****

Toe - In (Positive Degrees)

        / ****   ****
       / ****      ****
      / ****         ****
     / ****            ****
    / ****               ****

Toe - Out (Negative Degrees]

     \ ****              ****
      \ ****            ****
       \ ****          ****
        \ ****       ****
         \ ****     ****

The amount of toe can be expressed in degrees as the angle to which the wheels are out of parallel

Toe settings affect three major areas of performance:

-Tire Wear
For minimum tire wear and power loss, the wheels on a given axle of a car should point directly ahead when the car is running in a straight line. Excessive toe-in or toe-out causes the tires to scrub, since they are always rotating relative to the direction of travel.

Too much toe-in causes accelerated wear at the outboard edges of the tires
Too much toe-out causes wear at the inboard edges.

-Straight-line Stability
So if minimum tire wear and power loss are achieved with zero toe, why have any toe angles at all?
Is that toe settings have a major impact on directional stability. With the steering wheel centered, toe-in causes the wheels to tend to roll along paths that intersect each other. Under this condition, the wheels are at odds with each other, and no turn results. Even with slight steering input the rolling paths of the wheels still don't make a turn. In this way, toe-in enhances straight-line stability.

-Corner Entry Only
If the car is set up with toe-out on the front tires any minute steering angle beyond the perfectly centered position will cause the inner wheel to steer in a tighter turn radius than the outer wheel. Thus, the car will always be trying to enter a turn, rather than maintaining a straight line of travel. So it's clear that toe-out encourages the initiation of a turn, while toe-in discourages it

Caster -

This is probably the hardest to explain. The technical description is the angle to which the steering pivot axis is tilted forward or rearward from vertical, as viewed from the side.

More (positive) caster will make your car easier to drive, and stable on the straights and bumpy sections.
Less (positive) caster will make your car react quicker to steering inputs. It will also give it more front bite in the corners. Less caster will make your car twitchy on the straights and out of corners.

I would recommend a middle to high caster. Running low caster makes your car very twitchy especially coming out of the corners, this is a problem because high exit speed is essential!

Brakes---------------------------------------------------------------------

What is Brake Bias?

Brake bias is the balance of braking power between the front and rear brakes.It is usually represented as a percentage. For example, a brake bias of65/35 means that the front brakes get 65% of the braking power, and the rear brakes get 35% of the braking power.

Why do I need to know?
Brake bias controls the way that the car handles when the brakes are applied.Therefore, it is useful in changing the corner entry handling characteristics of a car if braking is necessary going into a corner.

What happens on adjustment?
Moving the brake bias toward the front brakes makes the car tighter and more stable while braking and entering a turn. Moving the brake bias toward the rear makes the car looser while braking and entering a turn.Excessive front braking power can lock up the front tires and decrease the overall effectiveness of your brakes since you are not using the rear tires to slow down the car.

For the brake pressure (Turn ABS Off first, it is faster Very Happy) Find a comfortable sport on your controller when pulling the trigger down, Its hard to explain but each controller wheel has a sweet spot that you have to apply some pressure but not a ton. Try to make your pressure as comfy as possible, you don't want anything too extreme. Anywhere from 70 to 130 should be nice.

Springs and Ride Height---------------------------------------------------------------------

Springs

Typically, in most cases you will want the front to be stiffer than the back and softer in the rear.

Having a perfectly balanced car is not always ideal. Sometimes it's beneficial to slightly unbalance the car to your liking. For instance, softening the rear allows more weight to transfer to the rear of the car. It also allows you to get more traction on the rear which results in more grip. But, more weight in the back also means that you have to work harder to keep it in check.

Suspension can also help you create/reduce oversteer and understeer. If you stiffen the front or soften the rear, you can reduce oversteer. By stiffening the rear and softening the front, you increase oversteer.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*

Ride Height

Typically you want to go very close to the minimum, if not the lowest it can possibly go. You also want to keep them pretty much even OR have the front slightly higher than the back.

Why you ask?

The reason so is because you need the extra support for the engine when you brake. (Note: This is for both Mid Engine and Front Engine)

Anti-Roll Bars---------------------------------------------------------------------

The settings for the Anti roll bars are similar to the springs, Typically, you want more in the front than in the back.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*


Damping---------------------------------------------------------------------

Controls the suspension's stiffness and compression between wheel and the wheel-well. Both Rebound and Bump work in "reverse-way", for example having the Front Rebound higher than rear increases grip on the rear, because more weight is concentrated in the front tires under spring compression, so rear wheels can work more freely.

Rebound Stiffness -

Increasing Front Rebound - More grip in the rear
Decreasing Front Rebound - Reduces transitional under steer

Increasing Rear Rebound - More grip in the front
Decreasing Rear Rebound - Reduces transitional over steer

Front biased Rebound - Increases under steer & increases grip in RWD cars, sacrificing turn-in slightly
Rear biased Rebound - Increases over steer & highly recommended for FWD & AWD cars.
(The bigger the balance difference, the bigger the effect - bigger than 3.0 differences not encouraged)

You cant really have excessively high Rebound setups, it all depends what the Bump stiffness are set to. If you are using high Rebound (9.0+) with low Bump (<4.0) your car may become upset by curbs and such, this is also modified by ride height and suspension stiffness. Higher Rebound than Bump is a must. The Bump stiffness should be 75% of the Rebound's stiffness at maximum. Although the in-game Damping description says ~50% of the Rebound's stiffness should be minimum, it really doesn’t have to be. Low bump stiffness works great.

Bump Stiffness -

Increasing Front Bump - Increases under steer and slightly increases rear grip + modifies the effectiveness of Damping and Spring setups
Increasing Rear Bump - Increases over steer and slightly increases front grip + modifies the effectiveness of Damping and Spring setups


Decreasing Front Bump - Improves bump absorption + modifies the effectiveness of Damping & Springs
Decreasing Rear Bump - Improves bump absorption + modifies the effectiveness of Damping & Springs

Front biased Bump - Increases under steer + slightly increases grip in RWD cars
Rear biased Bump - Increases over steer & highly recommended for FWD & AWD cars.
(The bigger the balance difference, the bigger the effect - bigger than 2.0 differences not encouraged)

You will know when your Bump stiffness is excessively high. The chassis feels like it floats on the tires and you feel unconnected to the road. A good, practical way to test out your bump stiffness if you don’t want understand all the mumbo gumbo, is to take a mild curb aggressively and then seeing if the car rolls. (Don’t try Sebring or Maple curbs, they'll roll you no matter what). If it rolls, your setup is too stiff, if you already had your bump at <3.5 then the problem is in your ride height or rebound. Bump stiffness can always be kept relatively low. (I personally never use 5.0+ bump stiffness). Bump stiffness in general fine-tunes the Damping & Suspension.

Tune the springs & ride height before going over to damping.


Differential---------------------------------------------------------------------

Your differential controls how well your car is able to put down its power and torque to the road. A differential will send the power the wheels with the least amount grip, in normal, everyday driving condition the power is sent to the wheels on the left aka outside wheels, when turning right.

However in aggressive, racing condition, power is often sent to inside wheels, or the wheels on the right aka the inside wheels, when turning right. It does this because due to weight transfer to the left side of the car, the inside wheels have the least amount of grip.

This causes the car to lose traction and waste power, which is why high performance cars usually have limited slip diffs. If the differential sends to much of the torque to the inside, or outside wheel or wheels, the limited slip kicks in, and locks the wheels together, although keep in mind that a limited slip diff evenly lock your wheels together, one wheel is still receiving more torque, but only slightly.


Typically for racing, you will want pretty low differential settings in both the back in the front. Preferably between 5 and 45 is in the range which you want. Finding the perfect diff setting is tedious work, changing it by even 2 ticks can be really noticeable.

To adjust these, go into test drive and keep doing runs, (they don't have to be full runs, just enough to test out the setting) and start off with the max or minimum in the range (5 or 45). If you feel the car is slipping too much in the rear or front tires (which ever you are working on first) lower or raise(depending on if you started the max or min) until you are not slipping as much.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*I didn't write this all myself, I used some old tuning guides for drifting (for the information) and then applied it toward touge.

Thanks to APX Walker and Manual Clutch, as well as CerebralColton and KTLR. Also thanks to Wilson X for teaching me quite a bit Tuning, He made me earn my knowledge of Tuning.

_

Street Version Member | Touge Union Founder


Last edited by MiNdChArGeR on Tue Jan 22, 2013 5:41 pm; edited 4 times in total
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Rotary
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:17 pm

Awesome, should be good once it's done.

_
Garage Kaido | Touge Union

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sat Jan 12, 2013 8:43 pm

really awesome that your doing this, i can tell that this will help me out alot Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:23 pm

wow this is awesome been lookin for something comparable all over the place. I know its not done yet but i want to thank you already. That will sure help me out a lot
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MiNd
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:46 pm

MiNdChArGeR wrote:
This guide will be for tuning touge cars in the standard way, I know there are some people who tune their cars in unorthodox ways, but this will just be the normal way.

Complete Tuning Guide!


-------------Upgrades-------------


Performance - For Touge, not the most important, when you need to fill up the rest of your PI (Getting it to the top of the class such as B500, A600 etc

Handling - You pretty much want all race parts in this category. You want this because the most critical thing for touge is the cornering.

Drivetrain - Again, you want pretty much all of this. Most of these parts affect the acceleration (clutch & transmission) which is also very important for touge.

Tire and Wheels - Since race tires are the standard (and can't restrict them in public lobbies) you will want race tires and full width. The more tire on the road, the more grip you will have. Also you want to pick some aftermarket rims, most rims are lighter so it will make your car just a bit lighter.

-------------Tuning-------------


Tire Pressure---------------------------------------------------------------------

You can't transmit your car's power and handling potential to the road without the right tire setup, because tire pressure affects a tire's peak grip, responsiveness and wear. Adjust the front tire pressure when the tires are cold so they reach peak grip after they heat up to race temperatures.

Peak Grip Temperature is between 180 and 210 degrees, and as long as you're running a race psi of 30-34 degrees, you're still in good grip range.

To adjust. Start by doing some test laps, bring up the heat and tires misc. telemetry and observe the temperature & pressure. You could also run a lap in Hot Lap or a Public lobby, save the replay, and go to the telemetry that way. Either way, but the replay method helps for those who can't drive with the tire telemetry up since it is kinda distracting.

What you want in tuning your tires is to have all four tires AND the inner, middle, and outer parts of your tire relatively close to each other.

Now here are some scenarios you will run into-

Scenario - Cause - Recommended Adjustment

Center hotter than edges - Tire pressure too high - Reduce 1 psi for each 5 deg F difference

Edges hotter than center - Tire pressure too low - Add 1 psi for each 5 deg F difference

Inner edge hotter than outer edge - Too much negative camber - Decrease negative camber

Outer edge hotter than inner edge - Not enough negative camber or too much toe-in - Increase negative camber or decrease toe-in

Tire below peak temperature range - Tire pressure too high, tire too wide or springs/sway bars too soft at that axle - Decrease tire pressure. reduce tire width or stiffen up springs and sway bars on that axle

Tires above peak temperature range - Tire pressure too low, tire too narrow, or springs/sway bars too stiff at that axle - Increase tire pressure, increase tire width or soften up springs and sway bars on that axle

Front tires hotter than rear - Car is under steering. Too much front spring/sway bar, not enough rear spring/sway bar, front pressure too high, front tires too narrow, rear tires too wide - Soften up front spring and sway bar, stiffen up rear spring and sway bar, decrease front pressure or increase rear pressure

Rear tires hotter than front - Car is over steering. Too much rear spring/sway bar, not enough front spring/sway bar, front pressure too high, rear pressure too low, rear tires too narrow, front tires too wide - Soften up rear spring and sway bar, stiffen up front spring and sway bar, decrease rear pressure or increase front pressure

Alignment---------------------------------------------------------------------

When describing a cars handling, you will need to know these two terms, Oversteer and Understeer.

Oversteer - When the back end of your cars starts sliding, if your a drifter, then you know what this is Very Happy

Understeer - When you are trying to turn but the car just won't.

Camber -

Camber is the inward or outward tilt of the wheel when viewing from the front or rear of the car. Camber is probably the most useful and popular alignment adjustment that can be made to a streetcar.

Maximum cornering force is achieved when the camber of the outside wheels relative to the ground is about -0.5 degrees. A slight negative camber in a turn maximizes the tire contact patch due to the way the tire deforms under lateral load. Hence, it is good to have some negative camber to increase cornering force.

View from the front of a car

Camber - Straight (0 degrees)

          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****
          ****       ****

Camber - (Negative Degrees)

          / ****    ****
         / ****       ****
        / ****          ****
       / ****             ****
      / ****                ****

Camber - Out (Positive Degrees]

      \ ****                 ****
       \ ****              ****
        \ ****           ****
         \ ****       ****
          \ ****    ****

For Touge, you are going to want Negative camber for both front and rear, the key is to how much. Your going to want between -2.0 to -.5 in the front and about -1.7 to -0.3 in the rear. As you can see from the numbers, you will want more negative camber in the front than the rear.

Toe -

Toe is how close or far apart the fronts of the tires are from each other. It is a bit easier to show then to explain so more diagrams!

Top down view of a tire in pairs

Toe - Straight (0 degrees)

  / \   ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****
   |    ****       ****

Toe - In (Positive Degrees)

        / ****   ****
       / ****      ****
      / ****         ****
     / ****            ****
    / ****               ****

Toe - Out (Negative Degrees]

     \ ****              ****
      \ ****            ****
       \ ****          ****
        \ ****       ****
         \ ****     ****

The amount of toe can be expressed in degrees as the angle to which the wheels are out of parallel

Toe settings affect three major areas of performance:

-Tire Wear
For minimum tire wear and power loss, the wheels on a given axle of a car should point directly ahead when the car is running in a straight line. Excessive toe-in or toe-out causes the tires to scrub, since they are always rotating relative to the direction of travel.

Too much toe-in causes accelerated wear at the outboard edges of the tires
Too much toe-out causes wear at the inboard edges.

-Straight-line Stability
So if minimum tire wear and power loss are achieved with zero toe, why have any toe angles at all?
Is that toe settings have a major impact on directional stability. With the steering wheel centered, toe-in causes the wheels to tend to roll along paths that intersect each other. Under this condition, the wheels are at odds with each other, and no turn results. Even with slight steering input the rolling paths of the wheels still don't make a turn. In this way, toe-in enhances straight-line stability.

-Corner Entry Only
If the car is set up with toe-out on the front tires any minute steering angle beyond the perfectly centered position will cause the inner wheel to steer in a tighter turn radius than the outer wheel. Thus, the car will always be trying to enter a turn, rather than maintaining a straight line of travel. So it's clear that toe-out encourages the initiation of a turn, while toe-in discourages it

Caster -

This is probably the hardest to explain. The technical description is the angle to which the steering pivot axis is tilted forward or rearward from vertical, as viewed from the side.

More (positive) caster will make your car easier to drive, and stable on the straights and bumpy sections.
Less (positive) caster will make your car react quicker to steering inputs. It will also give it more front bite in the corners. Less caster will make your car twitchy on the straights and out of corners.

I would recommend a middle to high caster. Running low caster makes your car very twitchy especially coming out of the corners, this is a problem because high exit speed is essential!

Brakes---------------------------------------------------------------------

What is Brake Bias?

Brake bias is the balance of braking power between the front and rear brakes.It is usually represented as a percentage. For example, a brake bias of65/35 means that the front brakes get 65% of the braking power, and the rear brakes get 35% of the braking power.

Why do I need to know?
Brake bias controls the way that the car handles when the brakes are applied.Therefore, it is useful in changing the corner entry handling characteristics of a car if braking is necessary going into a corner.

What happens on adjustment?
Moving the brake bias toward the front brakes makes the car tighter and more stable while braking and entering a turn. Moving the brake bias toward the rear makes the car looser while braking and entering a turn.Excessive front braking power can lock up the front tires and decrease the overall effectiveness of your brakes since you are not using the rear tires to slow down the car.

For the brake pressure (Turn ABS Off first, it is faster Very Happy) Find a comfortable sport on your controller when pulling the trigger down, Its hard to explain but each controller wheel has a sweet spot that you have to apply some pressure but not a ton. Try to make your pressure as comfy as possible, you don't want anything too extreme. Anywhere from 70 to 130 should be nice.

Springs and Ride Height---------------------------------------------------------------------

Springs

Typically, in most cases you will want the front to be stiffer than the back and softer in the rear.

Having a perfectly balanced car is not always ideal. Sometimes it's beneficial to slightly unbalance the car to your liking. For instance, softening the rear allows more weight to transfer to the rear of the car. It also allows you to get more traction on the rear which results in more grip. But, more weight in the back also means that you have to work harder to keep it in check.

Suspension can also help you create/reduce oversteer and understeer. If you stiffen the front or soften the rear, you can reduce oversteer. By stiffening the rear and softening the front, you increase oversteer.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*

Ride Height

Typically you want to go very close to the minimum, if not the lowest it can possibly go. You also want to keep them pretty much even OR have the front slightly higher than the back.

Why you ask?

The reason so is because you need the extra support for the engine when you brake. (Note: This is for both Mid Engine and Front Engine)

Anti-Roll Bars---------------------------------------------------------------------

The settings for the Anti roll bars are similar to the springs, Typically, you want more in the front than in the back.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*


Damping---------------------------------------------------------------------

Controls the suspension's stiffness and compression between wheel and the wheel-well. Both Rebound and Bump work in "reverse-way", for example having the Front Rebound higher than rear increases grip on the rear, because more weight is concentrated in the front tires under spring compression, so rear wheels can work more freely.

Rebound Stiffness -

Increasing Front Rebound - More grip in the rear
Decreasing Front Rebound - Reduces transitional under steer

Increasing Rear Rebound - More grip in the front
Decreasing Rear Rebound - Reduces transitional over steer

Front biased Rebound - Increases under steer & increases grip in RWD cars, sacrificing turn-in slightly
Rear biased Rebound - Increases over steer & highly recommended for FWD & AWD cars.
(The bigger the balance difference, the bigger the effect - bigger than 3.0 differences not encouraged)

You cant really have excessively high Rebound setups, it all depends what the Bump stiffness are set to. If you are using high Rebound (9.0+) with low Bump (<4.0) your car may become upset by curbs and such, this is also modified by ride height and suspension stiffness. Higher Rebound than Bump is a must. The Bump stiffness should be 75% of the Rebound's stiffness at maximum. Although the in-game Damping description says ~50% of the Rebound's stiffness should be minimum, it really doesn’t have to be. Low bump stiffness works great.

Bump Stiffness -

Increasing Front Bump - Increases under steer and slightly increases rear grip + modifies the effectiveness of Damping and Spring setups
Increasing Rear Bump - Increases over steer and slightly increases front grip + modifies the effectiveness of Damping and Spring setups


Decreasing Front Bump - Improves bump absorption + modifies the effectiveness of Damping & Springs
Decreasing Rear Bump - Improves bump absorption + modifies the effectiveness of Damping & Springs

Front biased Bump - Increases under steer + slightly increases grip in RWD cars
Rear biased Bump - Increases over steer & highly recommended for FWD & AWD cars.
(The bigger the balance difference, the bigger the effect - bigger than 2.0 differences not encouraged)

You will know when your Bump stiffness is excessively high. The chassis feels like it floats on the tires and you feel unconnected to the road. A good, practical way to test out your bump stiffness if you don’t want understand all the mumbo gumbo, is to take a mild curb aggressively and then seeing if the car rolls. (Don’t try Sebring or Maple curbs, they'll roll you no matter what). If it rolls, your setup is too stiff, if you already had your bump at <3.5 then the problem is in your ride height or rebound. Bump stiffness can always be kept relatively low. (I personally never use 5.0+ bump stiffness). Bump stiffness in general fine-tunes the Damping & Suspension.

Tune the springs & ride height before going over to damping.


Differential---------------------------------------------------------------------

Your differential controls how well your car is able to put down its power and torque to the road. A differential will send the power the wheels with the least amount grip, in normal, everyday driving condition the power is sent to the wheels on the left aka outside wheels, when turning right.

However in aggressive, racing condition, power is often sent to inside wheels, or the wheels on the right aka the inside wheels, when turning right. It does this because due to weight transfer to the left side of the car, the inside wheels have the least amount of grip.

This causes the car to lose traction and waste power, which is why high performance cars usually have limited slip diffs. If the differential sends to much of the torque to the inside, or outside wheel or wheels, the limited slip kicks in, and locks the wheels together, although keep in mind that a limited slip diff evenly lock your wheels together, one wheel is still receiving more torque, but only slightly.


Typically for racing, you will want pretty low differential settings in both the back in the front. Preferably between 5 and 45 is in the range which you want. Finding the perfect diff setting is tedious work, changing it by even 2 ticks can be really noticeable.

To adjust these, go into test drive and keep doing runs, (they don't have to be full runs, just enough to test out the setting) and start off with the max or minimum in the range (5 or 45). If you feel the car is slipping too much in the rear or front tires (which ever you are working on first) lower or raise(depending on if you started the max or min) until you are not slipping as much.

*This section is unfinished and will be further updated.*

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*I didn't write this all myself, I used some old tuning guides for drifting (for the information) and then applied it toward touge.

Thanks to APX Walker and Manual Clutch, as well as CerebralColton and KTLR

I did some updating to the OP. It might not be perfect, but I hope it is a start for some. It isn't entirely finished yet.

On a side not, if you feel that something is inaccurate or you can explain better, message me on live and we can talk about it Very Happy

GT- MindCharger

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KraZe
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 20, 2013 6:25 pm

This is amazing! great work Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Mon Jan 21, 2013 10:25 am

Thanks, I hope some can learn more about tuning this way

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 27, 2013 11:57 am

Hey mind could i use this tuning guide to fine tune awd cars too? I know how to tune rwd cars but I have real trouble with tuning awd
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:08 pm

^The guide mentions settings that are useful on both FWD and AWD cars from time to time.

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:12 pm

Lol oh my bad for not reading it properly Embarassed lol
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:27 pm

It's LONG so that's understandable lol

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun Jan 27, 2013 12:46 pm

Yeah I had to read it a few times before i started tuning along with the guide
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:08 pm

This is somewhat related? I read someone's comments about not knowing how to tune well. This guide explains just about everything in detail (except for transmission gearing, I can help you with that Donnie if you need it Wink) So these are just my thoughts on HOW to approach tuning:

1) Everything is trial & error, you only have like a 1% chance of nailin' the perfect tune on the first try so keep that in mind. Some of my tunes took me days, even a week or two, to get absolutely perfect. So don't feel down if you encounter troubles with your tune.
2) Sometimes you know what you're doing, but most of the times you don't. In this situation, try the "halfway approach". Take springs for example: change the settings to softest, test it, and then change them to stiffest and test it. Decide which of the two ways you liked better and then do it again, but this time do it half way from the setting you chose to the average default one you had (from default to softest/stiffest).
It should look like this: 100/2 => 50/2 => 25/2 => 12.5/2 etc. Eventually you WILL get to where you want to be.
Continue shortening the possibilities for every aspect of your tune until you find the best settings for you. Wink

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:11 pm

Yeah its related, if your on tonight we can collab and finish some of the parts.

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:13 pm

^ok I'll try to be on once I finish with some stuff Wink

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:25 pm

KraZe wrote:
This is somewhat related? I read someone's comments about not knowing how to tune well. This guide explains just about everything in detail (except for transmission gearing, I can help you with that Donnie if you need it Wink) So these are just my thoughts on HOW to approach tuning:

1) Everything is trial & error, you only have like a 1% chance of nailin' the perfect tune on the first try so keep that in mind. Some of my tunes took me days, even a week or two, to get absolutely perfect. So don't feel down if you encounter troubles with your tune.
2) Sometimes you know what you're doing, but most of the times you don't. In this situation, try the "halfway approach". Take springs for example: change the settings to softest, test it, and then change them to stiffest and test it. Decide which of the two ways you liked better and then do it again, but this time do it half way from the setting you chose to the average default one you had (from default to softest/stiffest).
It should look like this: 100/2 => 50/2 => 25/2 => 12.5/2 etc. Eventually you WILL get to where you want to be.
Continue shortening the possibilities for every aspect of your tune until you find the best settings for you. Wink

damn gotta try out #2) asap
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:35 am

Wanted to contribute this oversteer/understeer adjustments table - this is taken directly from wikipedia(sauce http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racing_setup ) and is intended for real world cars, but can certainly be applied to forza tunes

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Tue Mar 12, 2013 2:58 pm

^Damn this is NICE! Very Happy thanks for sharing!

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:06 pm

Dude. That's impressive.

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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Thu May 09, 2013 1:01 am

Im having an issue with my suspension. When i turn on my telemetry to suspension i notice that when i take turns my suspension is maxing out from side to side. ( a left turn causes the right side to rise into the red. I believe this is bump ) are there any suggestions on how to stabalize the car more. Ive noticed the car is breaking loose when this occurs. There is a replay on my storefront if anyone will watch it and give me some tips.
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun May 19, 2013 5:11 am

skitchin wrote:
Wanted to contribute this oversteer/understeer adjustments table - this is taken directly from wikipedia(sauce http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racing_setup ) and is intended for real world cars, but can certainly be applied to forza tunes


this is awesome im gonna work over my setup using this. is there anything comparable on how to fine tune the turnability of cars??
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun May 19, 2013 9:36 am

just mess with your diff, sway bars and suspension stiffness/softness lol thats a vague answer i know Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Sun May 19, 2013 2:42 pm

The thing is unless i understand what happens because of which adjustment. I cant use it effectively xD
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Tue May 28, 2013 6:47 pm

Could anyone give some input on front tire width. I know we want max grip so i go for the max on front and back but i thought skinnier tires on the front are supposed to help turnability. Anyone?
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PostSubject: Re: Touge Tuning Guide *Updated!*   Wed May 29, 2013 8:40 am

if possible just stick with the fattest tires. in forza fatter tires = more grip
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